Clinical

Cutaneous adverse food reactions

Dietary-induced skin problems of cats and dogs can include food intolerances, primary and secondary nutrient deficiencies and nutrient toxicities. A full dietary history needs to be taken and owners should include specific commercial foods, all snacks and treats, supplements, chewable/palatable medications and vitamins, chew toys, human foods and any food that the animal may have access to. Actively encourage owners to keep a food diary, as with obese animals and diabetics. The classification...

Compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction and burnout during a pandemic

Background: Work-related mental health issues in New Zealand are increasing yearly and impact on how employees are able to cope with day-to-day pressures and work productivity. Work-related mental health issues are especially prevalent during times of great stress such as the coronavirus pandemic. Aim: In this study, the prevalence of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction were assessed using the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scale and a range of demographic and...

Use of broad-spectrum parasiticides in canine and feline parasitology

Companion dogs and cats are exposed daily to several internal and external parasites, and to pathogens transmitted by arthropods. Efficacious prophylactic and therapeutic measures are of paramount importance to controlling the occurrence and diffusion of parasitosis and arthropod-borne diseases, as well as protecting both human and animal health. Several broad-spectrum parasiticides are available on the market and represent a crucial tool for the treatment and/or prevention of several canine and...

Weight management: insights from the science of human behaviour change

Helping animal owners to recognise and manage obesity in their animals is a particularly complex area of communications in veterinary medicine. Several studies have outlined the difficulty veterinary professionals face in such discussions, including frustration with the client, embarrassment (particularly if the owner is also overweight), and a sense of inevitable failure. However, obesity continues to be a serious and prevalent welfare problem in dogs, cats, and probably other companion animals...

Veterinary management of feline osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a progressive, degenerative condition, which causes mobility issues and behavioural changes in affected cats as a result of chronic pain. Despite reports in the literature suggesting a vast prevalence of the condition among the domestic cat population, the condition appears to be underdiagnosed. This is likely due to a combination of subtle clinical signs, lack of owner awareness and poor correlation between radiographical changes and severity of clinical signs. Multimodal...

How to provide early enteral nutrition in the canine pancreatitis patient

This article provides a useful insight into the benefits of early enteral nutrition in canine pancreatitis patients. A brief explanation of the anatomy and physiology, followed by the pathophysiology, helps the reader understand the disease process. Feeding tubes are beneficial in anorexic patients and selecting a diet and calculating the resting energy requirements is an essential skill to practice to help prevent malnutrition. This article provides a practical step-by-step guide on how to...

Clinical presentation and management of liver lobe torsions in domestic rabbits

Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are common household pets, and make endearing companions for both the young and old. Rabbit medicine has advanced greatly in recent years, and we are now able to recognise, diagnose and treat many conditions and presentations that may have previously been poorly understood. One of the conditions that is increasingly recognised is liver lobe torsion, which can prove difficult to recognise in clinical practice, especially if the team has not encountered the...

Nursing the canine immunemediated haemolytic anaemia patient part 2: supportive care and nursing

Patients with immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia (IMHA) require substantial nursing care considerations, and can be very unwell on presentation. The registered veterinary nurse (RVN) plays an important role, with comprehensive supportive care of vital importance. Patients with IMHA have the potential for many complications, therefore it is important for the RVN to have knowledge of the condition, its treatment options, and how they may impact the patient's needs. Alongside vigilant nursing, and...

Fungal infections in cats and dogs

Fungal infections are an easily diagnosable cause of skin disease in companion animals. This article aims to give an overview of the more common fungal infections seen in cats and dogs, how to investigate them, and how to treat them. A small section on rarer fungal infections is included for information. Veterinary nurses are often involved in dermatology clinics, so knowledge of both common and rarer dermatomycoses can be very useful.

Use of therapeutic laser in the veterinary field

Therapeutic laser is an increasingly popular tool used in veterinary medicine. Therapeutic laser for veterinary patients aids the body's natural healing process, decreases healing time, alleviates pain and inflammation, and helps to delay progressive diseases. Therapeutic laser can be used immediately following procedures, in postoperative healing, and in a variety of disease processes. Therapeutic lasers are potentially dangerous tools and should be used with caution by trained veterinary...

The potential benefit of local anaesthetics during routine ovariohysterectomy

Registered veterinary nurses (RVNs) play an essential and responsible role in pain management by identifying and alerting the veterinary surgeon (VS) to allow the appropriate management of pain. This comes with a legal and moral obligation in accordance with the Animal Welfare Act (2006) and the Code of Professional Conduct for Veterinary Nurses to provide prompt analgesia to their patients. Ovariohysterectomy is a common procedure performed within veterinary practices. It is a painful procedure...

An evidence-based approach to workplace anaesthesia training. Part 2

Part one of this article considered the value of using educational evidence to teach student veterinary nurses (SVNs), discussed the characteristics of SVNs as learners, and described the importance of developing SVNs—not only in their anaesthetic skills, but also in becoming more self-directed professionals. As part one highlighted some of the challenges that SVNs experience as they attempt to learn in a veterinary practice, this second part will consider some common questions about veterinary...

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