Veterinary nurses on the front line in the battle against superbugs

Jennifer Hamlin
September 2014

Multidrug resistant bacteria, such as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are an increasing public health concern and there is a growing body of evidence about how animals may, or may not, be contributing to the spread of these organisms. A few weeks ago I came across a journal article, published in January of this year, which reported on a survey of companion animal wound cultures showing an alarming number of positive cases of MRSA infection (Vincze et al, 2014a). A similar study by some of the same authors, and published only a few weeks ago, looked at risk factors related to MRSA infection in companion animals and it mentions how nosocomial infections are a distinct route of infection (Vincze et al, 2014b). Other past studies report how veterinary staff have a higher incidence of being MRSA carriers than the general population (Jordan et al, 2011).

Veterinary nurses on the front line in the battle against superbugs
Veterinary nurses on the front line in the battle against superbugs

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