A comparison of the v-gel® supraglottic airway device and non-cuffed endotracheal tube in the time to first capnograph trace during anaesthetic induction in rabbits

Deborah Richardson
September 2015

Background:Rabbit anaesthesia can be a daunting prospect for many veterinary professionals. Their intubation can be difficult; because of this many rabbits are not intubated during major surgery.Aim:To compare two methods of rabbit intubation and evaluate which achieved a reliable airway in the least time. This will in turn hopefully encourage veterinary nurses to take a more proactive role in rabbit anaesthesia.Materials and methods:Eight rabbits that were admitted for elective neutering were randomly assigned either an endotracheal tube or a v-gel®. Using capnography the ease and success rate of intubation was assessed.Results:The time taken to intubate a rabbit in the v-gel group was quicker than using an endotracheal tube.Conclusion:The v-gel proved to be a reliable method to intubate a rabbit, reducing the risk of trauma to the patient.

A comparison of the v-gel® supraglottic airway device and non-cuffed endotracheal tube in the time to first capnograph trace during anaesthetic induction in rabbits
A comparison of the v-gel® supraglottic airway device and non-cuffed endotracheal tube in the time to first capnograph trace during anaesthetic induction in rabbits

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