An examination of perioperative temperature fluctuations in canine patients undergoing routine neutering

Mary Fraser
March 2015

Objective:To examine the fluctuations in body temperature in dogs undergoing routine neutering both during surgery and in the recovery phase.Methods:Utilising a convenience sampling approach, body temperatures of 17 healthy male and female dogs undergoing routine neutering were monitored during and after anaesthesia. Temperature recording was carried out with an auricular thermometer to minimise stress and discomfort. Data analysis was carried out using Microsoft Excel 2013 and Minitab 15.Results:Body temperature of 15 of the 17 dogs dropped below 37°C at some point during or after anaesthesia. Examination of median temperature results revealed a drop from the time of preparation for surgery, through to the time of discharge up to 6 hours after the end of general anaesthesia. At discharge the body temperature of five dogs was still lower than 37°C. Body temperature did not return to preanaesthesia levels during the recovery stage for 16 of the 17 patients.Conclusion:Following anaesthesia dogs are likely to demonstrate a lower than normal body temperature and should therefore be monitored throughout recovery. Longer hospitalisation may be required to ensure patients are only discharged once their temperature has returned to baseline level.

An examination of perioperative temperature fluctuations in canine patients undergoing routine neutering
An examination of perioperative temperature fluctuations in canine patients undergoing routine neutering

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