Analysis of predisposition factors for limb amputation in dogs with survival analysis in those diagnosed with appendicular cancer

Fernando Mata
September 2014

Aims:This study aimed to contribute to the knowledge of epidemiological factors contributing to limb amputation in dogs. A survival analysis for limb amputees from cancerous causes was also performed.Methods:Data were collected in 2010 from 152 owners of amputee dogs. And a statistical analysis was performed to differentiate effects of gender, castration, age, breed, treatment and behaviour after surgery. A cox regression was also performed to analyse these same effects in survivability.Results:A larger proportion of amputee bitches than dogs are associated with cancer while a larger proportion of amputee dogs than bitches are associated with trauma; castrated/spayed dogs were diagnosed older than intact dogs; cancerous causes of amputation were diagnosed later in dogs' lives than traumatic causes; dogs showing an animal behaviour in the first week after amputation were diagnosed with cancer younger than dogs showing a vegetal/rock behaviour. Treatment by chemotherapy has a better survivability than holistic therapy, and patient receiving chemotherapy exhibit animal rather than vegetal/rock behaviour.Conclusion:The survival analysis gives clear indication of the benefits of chemotherapy over holistic treatments. Animal behaviour post surgery is also related to survivability.

Analysis of predisposition factors for limb amputation in dogs with survival analysis in those diagnosed with appendicular cancer
Analysis of predisposition factors for limb amputation in dogs with survival analysis in those diagnosed with appendicular cancer

Subscribe to get full access to The Veterinary Nurse

Thank you for vising The Veterinary nurse and reading our archive of expert clinical content. If you would like to read more from the leading peer-reviewed journal for veterinary nurses, you can start your subscription today for just £26.

Subscribing will enable you to:

  • Stay up-to-date with current thinking and best practice in veterinary medicine
  • Enhance your knowledge and understanding of all key clinical topics
  • Achieve the mandatory requirement of 45 hours' documented CPD over a three-year period
Subscribe now

Already registered? - Sign in here

Keep up to date with The Veterinary Nurse!

Sign up to The Veterinary Nurse's regular newsletters and keep up-to-date with the very latest clinical research and CPD we publish each month.