Comparison of oesophageal, rectal and tympanic membrane temperature in anaesthetised client-owned cats

FCE Watson
April 2015

Objectives:To determine the agreement between a veterinary-specific tympanic membrane thermometer and measurement of core oesophageal and rectal temperature in client-owned anaesthetised cats.Methods:A prospective study was performed using 20 cats that were scheduled to undergo general anaesthesia. For each cat, five consecutive temperature recordings were taken from an oesophageal temperature probe (OT), rectal thermometer (RT) and a veterinary-specific tympanic membrane thermometer (TT) prior to surgery. The temperatures were compared using Bland-Altman analysis.Results:Mean differences for the TT compared with OT and RT were -0.86°C (SD = 0.62°C, 95% CI [-2.39°C, 0.67°C]) and -0.93°C (SD = 0.57°C, 95% CI [-2.27, 0.44]) respectively; both greater than the accepted maximal clinical tolerance of 0.20°C. The mean difference for the RT compared with the OT was 0.06°C (SD = 0.28°C, 95% CI [-0.56, 0.67]).Clinical significance:The TT does not accurately represent core body temperature in cats under general anaesthesia and should not be used interchangeably with oesophageal thermometers. Rectal temperatures can be used to reliably approximate core temperature in anaesthetised cats.

Comparison of oesophageal, rectal and tympanic membrane temperature in anaesthetised client-owned cats
Comparison of oesophageal, rectal and tympanic membrane temperature in anaesthetised client-owned cats

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