Osteoarthritis

Rehabilitation following surgical management of canine osteoarthritis

Surgical management of osteoarthritis is indicated for patients severely affected by osteoarthritis for which conservative management alone is not achieving the desired results. The joint(s) of the...

Joint pain and mobility

The four main causes of joint pain in dogs are:.

The geriatric guinea pig

Arthritis is often seen in guinea pigs that are suffering from hypovitaminosis C (scurvy) as this results in intra-articular haemorrhage (Witkowska et al, 2017). It has also been noted in those...

An investigation of the impact of body condition score on the grade of intervertebral disc disease and recovery time

The first objective of this study was to identify whether there was a significant difference between IVDD grades in each weight group. No significant difference was found. No other authors have...

How to protect the joints of the growing dog

Advice on how to exercise the growing dog should vary depending on breed size, as this affects the timeframe for longitudinal bone growth and growth plate closure. While load-bearing exercise is...

Osteoarthritis in canines part 2: physical rehabilitation

When the osteoarthritic patient comes into the hospital or facility, they need to be provided with plenty of cushions and bedding suitable for arthritic joints and backs (Figure 1). Geriatric dogs...

Maintaining mental and physical fitness into old age

Homes can be a challenge for older dogs that may be suffering from mobility issues or discomfort and/or sensory impairment affecting their eyesight or hearing. The leading sense for dogs is the sense...

Osteoarthritis in canines part 1: geriatric pain management

Behaviours that the owner may see early during the disease are the dog sporadically reluctant to perform previous tasks or activities, such as jumping into the car, which never posed a problem before....

Veterinary management of feline osteoarthritis

The aetiology of feline OA is different to that of canine OA. There is much less evidence to support OA secondary to developmental disease processes such as dysplasia, with one particular study citing...

Canine developmental elbow disease part 2: surgical and non-surgical management

There is conflicting evidence as to the benefit of surgical management of different forms of elbow disease. In a study by Burton et al (2011) conservative management resulted in the same outcome in...

Canine developmental elbow disease part 1: aetiopathogenesis and diagnosis

The most common age for onset of clinical signs of developmental elbow disease is between 6 to 10 months of age, however some dogs only present as middle aged or older adults when they have advanced...