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About The Veterinary Nurse

The Veterinary Nurse – now part of the UK-VET group of titles – is the leading international peer-reviewed journal for veterinary nurses. It publishes evidence-based clinical, educational and practical articles, in addition to the latest nurse-led veterinary research. It promotes gold standard care by supporting readers’ continuing professional development and by sharing best practice worldwide.

Clinical

Best practice parasite prevention in the travelling pet

  • June 2019

The number of pets travelling under PETS is increasing year on year, while at the same time, climate change and increased movement of people is affecting parasite distribution across Europe and the wider world. Accurate parasite prevention advice to...

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Achieve all your CPD: The Veterinary Nurse  produces an extensive range for CPD content, supporting subscribers to complete the mandatory requirement of 45 hours’ CPD over a 3-year period. Premium and website subscribers can access our latest and archive modules, a selection of which can be found below. Subscribe Today

Best practice parasite prevention in the travelling pet

The number of pets travelling under PETS is increasing year on year, while at the same time, climate change and increased movement of people is affecting parasite distribution across Europe and the wider world. Accurate parasite prevention advice to clients taking their pets abroad is therefore vital to keep pets and owners safe. It is also an important aspect of UK biosecurity and the prevention of exotic parasites and vectors establishing. Although it is the role of the Official Veterinarians (OV) to issue passports and ensure legal pet travel requirements are followed, nurses also play a pivotal role in discussing parasite risks with clients and ensure accurate up to date preventative advice is given. This article summarises the risks posed by some of the major parasites and vectors across Europe and effective practical prevention advice to give to clients.

Toxoplasma gondii – the facts

The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii was initially isolated from the rodent Ctenodactylus gundi, and it has been found worldwide from Alaska to Australia with nearly one third of the human population having been exposed to this parasite. All warm-blooded hosts, including humans, can be infected by any one of its three infective stages: tachyzoites, bradyzoites, and sporozoites. Felids are the definitive hosts of this intracellular pathogen. Although it usually causes mild disease or asymptomatic infection in immunocompetent adults, this parasite can cause devastating disease in congenitally infected children and those with depressed immunity. Because of its zoonotic potential, toxoplasmosis triggers the interest of the diverse medical and veterinary specialities. Consciousness needs to be increased that this disease can produce clinical cases not only in immunocompromised patients or through vertical transmission, but also in healthy patients. In this article, we will review the biology and the epidemiology of this parasite.

Rehabilitating the canine cruciate patient: part two

Surgery to correct cranial cruciate ligament rupture is commonly performed in both first opinion and referral practice. Following on from part one of this article which discusses the background aetiology, diagnosis and conservative management of cruciate disease, this article looks at the three most commonly performed surgical procedures as treatment options, and rehabilitation of the canine patient post surgery.

Endo and ectoparasites in rabbits

There are numerous endo and ectoparasites that can affect domestic rabbits. Many of these may not have a clinical effect on the rabbit and treatment may not therefore be required. However, for those that cause clinical signs it is imperative that early diagnosis and correct treatment is implemented, since any delay in this can have serious consequences for the rabbit's health and welfare, as well as human health, as many are zoonotic.

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