Feline stress in a nutshell — why does it occur, how can it be recognised, and what can be done to alleviate it?

Claire Hargrave
Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Many cat owners assume that their cat's relative independence ensures that the cat has a considerable level of choice regarding their encounters with stimuli that could be potential stressors. As a result, a substantial number of cat owners consider their cat to live a stress-free life. Yet the PDSA's 2016 PAWS report found that UK veterinary surgeons considered chronic stress to be among the three top welfare problems for cats. Consequently, there is an obvious role for the veterinary team in owner education regarding the prevention, recognition and alleviation of feline stress within the domestic environment.

Feline stress in a nutshell — why does it occur, how can it be recognised, and what can be done to alleviate it?
Feline stress in a nutshell — why does it occur, how can it be recognised, and what can be done to alleviate it?

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