Fibroadenomas in rats

Rachel Sibbald
Wednesday, June 2, 2021

This article looks at one of the most common reasons for presentation to practice in rats, mammary fibroadenomas. There is an extremely high incidence of this disease process in rats over 1 year of age and veterinary nurses have a duty of care towards these patients to provide up-to-date nursing techniques and engage in clinical discussions with veterinary surgeons to implement appropriate treatment plans. Surgical and medical options are explored along with tips for successful anaesthetic management of these patients. Although these neoplasms are benign, they are often fast growing and can significantly affect quality of life in rat companions.

Figure 1. Mammary tissue is extensive in rats and fast growing masses on the ventral abdomen or down the flanks should be investigated and/or surgically removed. This rat is prepped for surgical removal of a mammary mass. Note the use of a clear surgical drape to allow the anaesthetist to monitor respiration efforts.
Figure 1. Mammary tissue is extensive in rats and fast growing masses on the ventral abdomen or down the flanks should be investigated and/or surgically removed. This rat is prepped for surgical removal of a mammary mass. Note the use of a clear surgical drape to allow the anaesthetist to monitor respiration efforts.

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