Brachycephalic ocular syndrome

David Nutbrown-Hughes
Friday, October 2, 2020

The small brachycephalic breeds such as the Pug and French Bulldog are currently extremely popular. The conformation of these breeds is part of their appeal to owners, however it leads to ocular surface disease such as corneal ulceration and pigmentation. The eye problems associated with these breeds are collectively known as brachycephalic ocular syndrome. In the normal situation there is a close interaction between the tear film, the eyelids and the cornea, which in the affected breeds is disrupted. Treatment needs to address the causes of the problem, such as lid anatomy, as well as the resultant corneal disease. Combinations of both medical and surgical treatment are required. Hospitalisation and anaesthesia of these cases requires careful, gentle handling and caution to prevent respiratory distress and damage to their often fragile eyes.

Figure 1 A macropalpebral fissue with a large area of medial scleral exposure and medial trichiasis as a result of entropion.
Figure 1 A macropalpebral fissue with a large area of medial scleral exposure and medial trichiasis as a result of entropion.

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