Changes in behaviour in elderly cats and dogs, part 2: management, treatment and prevention

Caroline Warnes
Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Behaviour changes in elderly cats and dogs can indicate the presence of a number of different medical problems as well as the development of age-related cognitive dysfunction. The quality of life of elderly animals with mobility problems, sensory loss and cognitive dysfunction can be significantly improved through the use of management strategies designed to improve accessibility to their environment and important resources. In addition, there are various treatment options available for animals with cognitive dysfunction including dietary supplementation, increasing mental and physical stimulation and medication. Veterinary nurses need to be able to advise owners about these and help design treatment plans that are appropriate for individual animals taking into account any other health or behavioural problems they may have. They can also advise pet owners about preventive strategies that may help increase cognitive reserve and slow the rate of cognitive decline as animals age.

Changes in behaviour in elderly cats and dogs, part 2: management, treatment and prevention
Changes in behaviour in elderly cats and dogs, part 2: management, treatment and prevention

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