Parasiticides in dogs and cats: a risk-based approach

There are emerging concerns that parasiticide use in small animal veterinary medicine is contributing to environmental contamination with pesticide compounds.

Zoonotic hookworms and roundworms affecting dogs and cats in Europe

Roundworms reside within the lumen of the small intestine, feeding on nutrients within it. The clinical picture in infected animals depend on different factors related to the host (eg age) or to the...

Immune-mediated polyarthritis: the role of the veterinary nurse

Non-erosive IMPA is typically induced by a type III hypersensitivity reaction where immune complexes collect in the joint space. Immune complexes are derived from bound antigen–antibody formations and...

Do ‘CARE’ labelled canine patients get a lower standard of nursing care?

A total of 390 registered veterinary nurses completed the questionnaire: 56% of respondents were in the 25–34 year age group, with 99% of the sample identifying as female. The majority of respondents...

Clinical features of hepatozoonosis in dogs and cats

Hepatozoonosis caused by H. canis is often subclinical or characterized by non-specific clinical signs, i.e. fever, lymphadenopathy, weight loss, anorexia, lethargy and haematobiochemical alterations,...

Awareness and management of canine cognitive dysfunction

Owners may note a decrease in responses to well established cues (Landsberg and Araujo, 2005). This may result from dwindling eyesight and hearing (Landsberg and Ruehl, 1997; Szabó et al, 2018)....

Soil contamination with Toxocara spp. eggs in public parks in the Midlands

The present study found evidence of soil contamination with Toxocara spp. eggs in the East Midlands region. Results indicated that 74% of the parks were contaminated, with soil prevalence levels of...

Use of broad-spectrum parasiticides in canine and feline parasitology

Intestinal helminthes of companion animals are of primary importance in daily clinical practice (Figure 1). The roundworms (ascarids), Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati (Figure 2), infecting dogs and...

Pheromones and 25 years of pheromonotherapy: what are they and how do they work?

Pheromones are biologically active semiochemicals (chemical signals from one organism to another capable of bringing about a change in the recipient organism); they are secreted from the body of one...

Socialisation: is it the ‘be all and end all’ of creating resilience in companion animals?

McMillan (2016) suggested that social animals that form strong relationships and are integrated most strongly into group living are most likely to survive, reproduce, and raise offspring to...

Management of ticks and tick-borne diseases: challenges and opportunities

Ticks can seriously compromise the health of affected animals through various mechanisms. For example, severe anaemia or immunosuppression can result from blood loss caused by the feeding and...

Tea tree oil exposure in cats and dogs

Tea tree oil, also known as melaleuca oil, is an essential oil obtained by steam distillation from the leaves and terminal branches of the Australian tea tree, Melaleuca alternifolia (Carson et al,...

Xylitol toxicosis in dogs

Xylitol is found in numerous products (Box 1). It is used as a sweetener and is frequently found in sugar-free chewing gums (Figure 1) and confectionary where it protects against tooth decay. It is...

An update on the risks and benefits of neutering in dogs

According to the Pet Food Manufacturer's Association (PFMA, 2017) there are just over 8.5 million pet dogs in the UK. Although there are no accurate records of how many of these dogs are neutered,...