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About The Veterinary Nurse

The Veterinary Nurse – now part of the UK-VET group of titles – is the leading international peer-reviewed journal for veterinary nurses. It publishes evidence-based clinical, educational and practical articles, in addition to the latest nurse-led veterinary research. It promotes gold standard care by supporting readers’ continuing professional development and by sharing best practice worldwide.

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Achieve all your CPD: The Veterinary Nurse  produces an extensive range for CPD content, supporting subscribers to complete the mandatory requirement of 45 hours’ CPD over a 3-year period. Premium and website subscribers can access our latest and archive modules, a selection of which can be found below. Subscribe Today

Diet in canine dermatology part 2: management of cutaneous adverse food reactions

The second in this two part series on nutritional management of dermatological conditions in dogs focuses on the role of diet in cutaneous adverse food reactions (both food allergies and intolerances). It reviews the most common causes of food allergies, how to diagnose them via an elimination diet trial and potentially appropriate diets for the trial. It also explores the most common reasons for failure of a diet trial, the role of the veterinary nurse in providing support and education for caregivers, and a number of ‘top tips’ to increase the likelihood of success of the trial. Finally, longer-term management of patients diagnosed with an adverse food reaction is discussed.

Small mammal herbivores part 1: digestive system adaptations to a herbivorous diet

Nutritional disease is common in exotic companion mammals, and the unique dietary adaptations of herbivorous species only compounds this issue. The target species (including lagomorphs, and hystricomorph or caviomorph rodents) exhibit anatomical and physiological adaptations to a plant-based diet that is low in calories and protein, and high in fibre. Digestive tract adaptations such as hypselodont dentition to hindgut fermentation will be reviewed. Veterinary nurses are in an excellent position to counsel pet owners on the appropriate nutrition of their companion animals, and understanding these unique adaptations provides the necessary baseline knowledge to make recommendations.

CPD article: Diet in canine dermatology part 1: nutrition for skin health and support

Nutrition has a very important role to play in supporting skin and coat health, both in healthy dogs and in those with skin conditions. Key nutrients include protein — which composes 95% of each hair within the coat — omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, zinc, and different vitamins. These nutrients play different roles within the skin, and dietary intake of some or all of them may need to be considered in an individual patient. The role of each of these nutrients will be explored, along with the potential benefits of nutritional modification as part of a multimodal management approach in the support of patients with skin conditions. The article will also look at the role of supplements, and review the latest knowledge about how manipulation of the microbiome may play a role in patients with atopy.

CPD article: How to create a dog friendly clinic

For many reasons, dogs can find visiting the veterinary surgery challenging. This article discusses the need to understand dogs' feelings and observe their body language, providing examples of how the veterinary environment might impact canine emotional wellbeing. Recommendations are provided for stress reduction adaptations to improve the veterinary experience. Approaches to handling are also discussed, including the importance of considering the dog's perspective of these. The use of low stress handling techniques are promoted, with examples provided for common clinical treatment and necessary interactions, as well as general guiding principles. The importance of the owner within the dog's lifelong veterinary journey is also highlighted, with considerations including owner emotional state, ability to support their dog emotionally, and knowledge of their dog's normal reactions. Preventative measures to better prepare a dog for the clinic environment, such as puppy appointments, are alluded to with references to detailed resources provided.

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