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About The Veterinary Nurse

The Veterinary Nurse – now part of the UK-VET group of titles – is the leading international peer-reviewed journal for veterinary nurses. It publishes evidence-based clinical, educational and practical articles, in addition to the latest nurse-led veterinary research. It promotes gold standard care by supporting readers’ continuing professional development and by sharing best practice worldwide.

Clinical

Endotracheal intubation of small exotic mammals

The veterinary nurse or technician plays an important role in avian and exotic anaesthesia, often inducing, intubating, and maintaining an anaesthetic while the veterinary surgeon prepares for a procedure. Gone are the days of avian and exotic...

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Latest CPD

Achieve all your CPD: The Veterinary Nurse  produces an extensive range for CPD content, supporting subscribers to complete the mandatory requirement of 45 hours’ CPD over a 3-year period. Premium and website subscribers can access our latest and archive modules, a selection of which can be found below. Subscribe Today

CPD article: Diet in canine dermatology part 1: nutrition for skin health and support

Nutrition has a very important role to play in supporting skin and coat health, both in healthy dogs and in those with skin conditions. Key nutrients include protein — which composes 95% of each hair within the coat — omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, zinc, and different vitamins. These nutrients play different roles within the skin, and dietary intake of some or all of them may need to be considered in an individual patient. The role of each of these nutrients will be explored, along with the potential benefits of nutritional modification as part of a multimodal management approach in the support of patients with skin conditions. The article will also look at the role of supplements, and review the latest knowledge about how manipulation of the microbiome may play a role in patients with atopy.

CPD article: How to create a dog friendly clinic

For many reasons, dogs can find visiting the veterinary surgery challenging. This article discusses the need to understand dogs' feelings and observe their body language, providing examples of how the veterinary environment might impact canine emotional wellbeing. Recommendations are provided for stress reduction adaptations to improve the veterinary experience. Approaches to handling are also discussed, including the importance of considering the dog's perspective of these. The use of low stress handling techniques are promoted, with examples provided for common clinical treatment and necessary interactions, as well as general guiding principles. The importance of the owner within the dog's lifelong veterinary journey is also highlighted, with considerations including owner emotional state, ability to support their dog emotionally, and knowledge of their dog's normal reactions. Preventative measures to better prepare a dog for the clinic environment, such as puppy appointments, are alluded to with references to detailed resources provided.

Veterinary nutritional assessment: the importance of an interprofessional approach

Few pet topics provoke more debate and discussion than pet nutrition. The veterinary healthcare team have a central role as the expert source of information for optimal pet nutrition, with each member capable of playing an important part in providing optimal nutritional support and recommendations. This article provides an important reminder of nutritional assessment and specific dietary recommendations as the fifth vital assessment and an essential part of patient care for every pet at every visit. It also presents the non-branded support materials and practical aids available in the WSAVA Global Nutrition Toolkit. Using a patient scenario, consideration is given to how nutritional care and support can be enhanced through interprofessional practice.

Summer poisoning hazards to pets

As the spring turns to summer, owners and their pets will spend even more time out of doors. Some venomous animals are more active in the warmer months and there is risk of adder bites or stings from bees, wasps and hornets. Adder bites can result in significant morbidity but low mortality. Insect stings commonly cause local reactions and although these are generally mild, stings involving the airway are more hazardous since there is risk of respiratory obstruction. In addition, there is also a risk of anaphylaxis in sensitive individuals (just as in people) and multiple stings can cause multiorgan damage. Slug and snail killer products are more commonly used in the summer and are therefore more accessible to pets. These commonly contain ferric phosphate rather than metaldehyde which has been banned in the UK, and are less hazardous. Harmful summer plants include those containing cardiac glycosides such as foxglove and oleander. Some plants such as hogweed contain compounds that cause skin damage following dermal contact in combination with exposure to sunlight, and are therefore a particular risk on sunny days.

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